We are now prepared for Maize Scandal’s second season, says Martha Karua.

Martha Karua NARC Kenya party leader

The administration has come under fire from Martha Karua, the leader of the NARC-Kenya party, for the suspected importation of maize into Kenya.
This is in light of rumors that an importation of corn has already docked at Mombasa Port without Parliament’s consent.

On Wednesday, Karua expressed his opinions on social media, saying that the importation of maize is a “get-rich-quick medium” for a select few people rather than a strategy to address the growing food problem.

The importation, she maintained, is unnecessary and will have negative effects on nearby farmers who are preparing to harvest their maize.

“All about the maize. source of food for the bulk of Kenyans’ daily meals. Wheeler dealers view imports as a quick way to get rich, often at the expense of regional farmers “Karua said on Twitter.

Ships docking with maize shipments when local farmers are harvesting and before import regulations are understood, she continued.

She then focused on President William Ruto, bringing up the 2009 Maize controversy that occurred when Ruto was Agriculture Minister.

was in his position as Agriculture Minister when he was charged with selling maize illegally.

Karua further asserted that if the current trajectory of maize importation is encouraged, the country should be prepared for another scandal.

“William Ruto, who served as agriculture minister in the grand coalition administration, was involved in the maize scam. The Maize Scandal’s second season is now prepared to begin “She spoke.

Karua referred to the approval of GMO items to enter the country with regard to the importation of GMO maize as “illegitimate” and “little more than a roadside declaration.”

Legislators have criticized Trade CS Moses Kuria over the imports and threatened to have him impeached if he does so.

David Pkosing, a member of parliament for Pokot South, asserted on Tuesday that CS Kuria lacked the power to mandate the importation of maize without first consulting the general public and other parties.

He argued that a gazette notice had to be presented to Parliament for discussion, and that only the results should be taken into account.

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